Action in Darfur opinion piece

5 04 2011

(The following is entirely an opinion piece and not a research piece)

We are getting ready to “help” Libya; we were on top of it almost right away. (By “we” I just mean the government supporters of “the Libya move” in general). The crisis/revolution/verge-of-war, whatever is is called, in Libya is tragic and terrible, but it is Libya’s problem. The citizens chose to rebel; and being more prosperous compared to Darfur, they also have something to fall back on. The citizens and the government worked themselves up into this mess, and can (try to) untangle it themselves. We can’t be running to every Middle East disturbance! The persecuted Darfurians have been trying to help themselves, but the government armies have been pushing, hurting and killing them into submission. Thousands of Darfur’s most vulnerable citizens have been exiled to refugee camps. Women have been raped, children killed–thousands upon thousands have been killed. We should not “babysit” a country in desperate need, but we must support and help protect them until the citizens have a foothold. Merely for the principal of it it is needed…and genocide and torture are atrocities that must not be allowed.  Libya may be in trouble, but it is a political fight…not a serious, unforgivable genocide.





How good is Bashir leaving (p. 2)

13 02 2011

Sudan could be off of the “terrorist list” by July, when the secession will be declare.  According to the article, it is only if the Sudanese government accepts what comes with the new referendum on freedom for South Sudan. This was all announced by Scott Gration, the “envoy” to Darfur. Gration seemed no more than a token glance to Darfur, to be a false answer to a terrible problem.  I do wonder if a man of his status would have suggested any solutions or ideas to address this problem to President Obama. And if he had, how did the President react? I’m rattling on now, but am still disgusted, talking of taking a horribly violent country and government off of our danger list when there had never been a serious investigation of Sudan/Darfur available to the general public. Bashir [reportedly] is seen as “the man who allowed Sudan to split,” as Sara Hassan, an analyst with IHS Global Insight, declared.

The article is slightly outdated as I write this; but it is still useful. Now that the south has voted for secession, Bashir’s declaration, announced before the vote, will come true. In “north” Sudan, there will be a state religion–Islam–and an official language–Arabic, BUT under a new constitution. An opposition group, the National Consensus Force, has asked for a national conference to rewrite the said constitution. However, Bashir continue(s) to demand his own wide-ranging government, the National Congress party.

So [north] Sudan will still be under the power of Bashir and he’ll always remain a threat. Yet, in the end, I’m not sure what would be worse; to use a light quote in a serious way, “it is better to have a fool you know than a fool you don’t know.” Perhaps whoever would replace Bashir at this time would be worse…even though no Bashir, without any backlash, would be ideal…





UN envoys ‘worried about Sudan violence’

5 10 2010

Envoys from 15 nations in the UN’s security council, headed to Sudan to restate that a secession with South Sudan MUST take place on January 9th as decided, expressed fears that a delay could start a violent civil war.  The meeting will not be with President Omar-Al Bashir but with senior officials. Bashir is wanted on war crimes charge[s].

Darfur rebel groups claim that the Sudanese groups have opened new attacks, but the UN has not confirmed this.

[The above ‘snippet’ adapted from this APF article; read it for much more detailed information and don’t forget my DarfurHerald Twitter]





More “talking” after violence in camp

27 08 2010

At the Kalma camp in Darfur, there is tension and violence between the internally displace persons, or IDP’s, supporting the Darfur peace process, and those against it.  According to the UN news center, the peace process is centralized in Doha, Qatar. The UNAMID states that “tension in the camp has de-escalated” but that it remains insecure.

Deputy Joint Special Rep. Mohamed Yonis and AU (African Union) Chairperson of Joint Special Commission, Jean Ping, were in a meeting 08/23.  Mr. Yonis emphasises that the Sudanese government and UNAMID need to work together to secure the camp (!!).

Opinion: When the government has been “masterminding” or at least collaborating with the violence in Sudan/Darfur and with the genocide, it doesn’t seem like there is great hope for compromise.

On another topic, I found a darkly amusing satirical political cartoon while looking for a map of Darfur via Google: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=35704&Cr=darfur&Cr1=





Zeinab Eyega: A Symbol of Advancement

12 12 2009

Zeinab Eyega was courageous. The word itself is weak and overdone by now. Zeinab Eyega has advanced herself by advancing the cause of women refugees in and from Sudan, Darfur and all over Africa. A former refugee herself, she escaped the terrible life and immigrated to the U.S. where she founded the Sauti Yetu Center for African women in NYC., serving African immigrant women with programs such as “family violence prevention, education, reproductive health and women’s rights*.”

*As the terms "Reproductive health" and "women's rights" cover birth control and contraception education and 
provision, and frequently abortion assistance, the author of this blog, while supporting Eyega and her cause,
does not personally advocate those particular services of Sauti Yetu




Stop the flow of weapons to Sudan!

10 12 2009

Encourage U.S. senators to help stop the flow of weapons to Sudan by sending this electronic letter here. This is hosted by Save Darfur.

According to Save Darfur:

Nearly two years after United Nations peacekeepers were deployed to Darfur, the Government of Sudan works at every turn to block their efforts to protect civilians.

Recently, the United Nations Panel of Experts responsible for monitoring the warring parties in Sudan issued a report confirming what we all already know: Bashir’s regime continues to defy the United Nations arms embargo as well as international humanitarian and human rights law.

In response, Senators Russ Feingold (D-WI) and John McCain (R-AZ) drafted a letter to Ambassador Susan Rice, the Obama administration’s representative to the United Nations. Their letter asks her to speak out publicly about these violations and ensure that troops and arms movements and additional sanctions are carefully reviewed by the Security Council.

Nearly two years after United Nations peacekeepers were deployed to Darfur, the Government of Sudan works at every turn to block their efforts to protect civilians.

Recently, the United Nations Panel of Experts responsible for monitoring the warring parties in Sudan issued a report confirming what we all already know: Bashir’s regime continues to defy the United Nations arms embargo as well as international humanitarian and human rights law.

In response, Senators Russ Feingold (D-WI) and John McCain (R-AZ) drafted a letter to Ambassador Susan Rice, the Obama administration’s representative to the United Nations. Their letter asks her to speak out publicly about these violations and ensure that troops and arms movements and additional sanctions are carefully reviewed by the Security Council.

*

The author of the blog is not affiliated with the mentioned organization and has only mentioned it for the 
humanitarian purposes of her blog.




Upping the ante for Obama-again

26 08 2009

I’m not going to talk about Obama; I’ll just be straightforward. This AP article reports that advertisements purchased by Save Darfur, Humanity International, Genocide Intervention Act, and I Act-Enough! (charities/aid programs and awareness programs) point out previous statements and outlines for action upon Darfur–including the envoy lead by Scott Gration. Action has been minimal, activists report.